Affiliated Faculty

William Howard is a Professor of Mathematics.  He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.  His field of specialization is proof theory, in which he has published several articles in the Journal of Symbolic Logic and other journals.  He is interested in the constructive foundations of mathematics, the applications of logic to computer science, and the history of mathematics.   He has previously worked at Bell Telephone Laboratories and taught at Pennsylvania State University.

David Marker is a Professor of Mathematics. He received a Ph.D. from Yale in 1983 and was previously a National Science Postdoctoral Fellow at Berkeley and Centennial Fellow of the American mathematical Society.  He is interested in mathematical logic, particularly model theory and is applications to: real algebraic and real analytic geometry, exponentiation, and differential algebra.  He is the author of Model Theory: An Introduction (Springer 2002).

Deirdre McCloskey is a UIC Distinguished Professor of Economics, History, English, and Communication, and adjunct in Philosophy and Classics.  Her philosophical interests include the philosophy and sociology of science, epistemology, pragmatism, virtue ethics, theology, and the history of social science, especially of economics.  Her philosophical works include Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics (1994), The Rhetoric of Economics (1985, 2nd ed. 1999), and The Bourgeois Virtues: Ethics for an Age of Commerce (2006).

Timothy F. Murphy  is Professor of Philosophy in the Biomedical Sciences in the College of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. from Boston College, and his main fields of interest are philosophy of medicine, the bioethics of genetic research, assisted reproduction, and human sexuality. During a sabbatical leave in Spring 2011, he wrote a book called Parents' Choices and the Future of Gay and Lesbian People.  He is also the author of Gay Science: The Ethics of Sexual Orientation Research (Columbia, 1997) and Ethics in an Epidemic: AIDS, Morality, and Culture (California 1994). He is also the co-editor of Justice and the Human Genome Project (California, 1994) and Writing AIDS: Gay Literature, Language, and Analysis (Columbia, 1993), and Case Studies in Biomedical Research Ethics (The MIT Press, 2004). From 1998 - 2001 he held a $663,000 grant in research ethics from the National Institutes of Health. He has also received grant support from the Department of Defense and has been a Fellow at the UIC Institute for the Humanities. His work appears regularly in the American Journal of Bioethics, Journal of Medical Ethics, Bioethics, Hastings Center Report and Reproductive Biomedicine Online. He is a member of the editorial board of the journals Bioethics and the American Journal of Bioethics.  He is vice chair of the Ethics Committee of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group.  The European Society for Human Reproduction has invited him to speak at their 2012 meeting in Istanbul, on the ethics of helping transgender men and women have children through assisted reproductive treatments.

Robert R. Williams is Professor Emeritus in Germanic Studies and Religious Studies. He received his Ph.D from Union Theological Seminary-Columbia University in New York . He has published in both philosophy and theology, with interests in Continental Philosophy (Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Foucault and Levinas) and German thought from Kant to Nietzsche, specialising in Hegel. He is author of Hegel’s Ethics of Recognition (1998), Recognition: Fichte and Hegel on the Other (1992), and Schleiermacher the Theologian: the Construction of the Doctrine of God (1978); translator and editor of Hegel's Lectures on the Philosophy of Spirit 1827/8 (Oxford University Press 2007) and I.A. Dorner: The Immutability of God (1994). A Fulbright Research Professor in Germany (1982), recipient of several NEH awards, and a fellow of the Humanities Institute at UIC 2002-3, he was President of the Hegel Society of America (1998-2000). He is currently completing the editing of a soon to be published manuscript "Tragedy, Recognition and the Death of God: Studies in Hegel and Nietzsche."